Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Amrut 100


Amrut 100 is a no age statement peated malt from the Indian distillery Amrut which is finished in 100 liter new oak casks.  It is sold in 1 liter (i.e. 100cl) bottles at 100 proof. Wait, you might say, 100 proof is 50% alcohol by volume (abv), and this whisky is 57.1% abv.  Ah, but the British had their own proof system that was different than the American system. And 100 British proof was equal to 57.15% abv.  Hmm, doesn't it seem like American proof should be just as strong if not stronger than the ones the Brits use?  I might write a letter to my Congressman about that.

They also claimed that only 100 bottles went to each country, though it seems readily available at numerous outlets, which means either that more than 100 bottles came to the US or it's selling very slowly.

Now you would think that this bottle would go for $100, but I suppose every gimmick has its exceptions and this one is price, which seems to range from $130 to $170 depending on where you shop.

Amrut 100, 57.1% abv ($150).

The nose is sweet and syrupy with peat, like a peated maple syrup.  The palate starts strong with bold peat notes but then turns sharply acidic with the acid lasting into the finish. Water is good for this one. A few drops tamps down the acid a bit, but it still comes out strong on the finish.

This is fine, but the acidic notes bring it out of balance.  I see no reason to pay $150 even for a liter of it.

Thanks to My Annoying Opinion for the sample, and check out his review of Amrut 100.


5 comments:

Florin said...

Good call Sku. I've also had problems with the acidic note that prevented me from getting into any Amrut - and I haven't seen anyone else mention it. It's a burn, but more like a woody heartburn than alcohol burn.

maltfascination.com said...

Hi Sku,

Billy, from The Whisky Exchange and other boozy things, investigated it a bit.

'Your' proof is the simplified version of the British Imperial proof.

According to some books I recently read the imperial proof was based on the ABV of rum poured over gunpowder, with the gunpowder still igniting.

Just my two cents.

sku said...

The gunpowder story is definitely the one I've heard about where the concept of proof comes from, though I have no idea if it's true or not.

Anonymous said...

"
They also claimed that only 100 bottles went to each country, though it seems readily available at numerous outlets, which means either that more than 100 bottles came to the US or it's selling very slowly.
"

I think you forget that it's a British 100, which means more than 100 when converted to American units.

Steffen Bräuner said...

When "really old" low ABV cask strength whisky is used to transform 57.1% 100 proof whisky to 50% 100 proof whiusky, the american version is the best

:-)